Does Powder Cause Clogged Pores?

Despite the common assumption, professionals claim that qualitative, proper chosen face powder is unlikely to cause clogged pores and cosmetic acne.

What is face powder?

Face powder is a commonly utilized beautifying product. About 70% of the women all over the world use it on a daily basis. Powder has gained such a wide dissemination due to its application simplicity and easy usability. There’s no better product to conceal blemishes and correct make up fast. Powder contributes to lasting make up as well.

Benefits from powder application include better skin looks, shine removal, matte finish and smooth complexion.

Face powder types

Pressed, loose and mineral powder can be differed.

Pressed powder is a compact powder that can be put on with a sponge or dry cosmetic puff. It suits for correcting makeup throughout the day.

Loose powder is sold in containers as a rule. It is applied with a large powder brush and has a good coverage. Typically loose powder is translucent. It works great to soothe and conceal redness and remove greasy luster without adding flaky looks. It suits perfectly for people with oily complexion due to its high ability to absorb oil.

Mineral powders are odorless, nontoxic and chemical-free. They are unlikely to cause allergy or blocked pores. Mineral powder has a long-lasting coverage and lets skin breathe. You may apply it solely or over the foundation. Mineral powder conceals fine lines and heals the skin, giving healthy looks.

Both loose powder and mineral powder resist harmful environmental impact and don’t cause clogged pores.
People with normal or dry skin prefer loose powder why oily skin owners tend to choose pressed powder. Though, if you had applied oil-free non-comedogenic primer underneath in advance, it doesn’t matter which powder type you have chosen: blocked pores and break-outs are unlikely.

The best way to avoid clogged pores is to remove face powder and other makeup remains before going to bed.

Cosmetic Acne and Pores Clogging

How cosmetics clog pores?

Cosmetic acne can strike everyone, even people who are resistant to acne manifestations. Cosmetics cause clogged pores (comedones). Most make up is usually removed during the day by clothes and rubbing, but some stays in the skin pores, builds up and provokes blocked pores, which inevitably leads to acne. Acne forms in a few weeks. Those who have sensitive skin or allergic reactions to any cosmetics ingredients are likely to get more severe acne in shorter time.

Cosmetic acne peculiarities

You can tell cosmetic acne by numerous small whiteheads on cheeks, chin and rarely forehead. Normally, it doesn’t leave scars, but it can be hard to get rid of cosmetic acne.

Cosmetic acne considerably differs from common acne by the cause of appearance. The latter is triggered by accumulation of oil, dead cells and bacteria while the former is caused by the impact of pore clogging products.

Many cosmetics are claimed to be anti-comedogenic. Stick to them if you suffer from cosmetic comedonal acne or susceptible to sensitive skin problems. This, combined with daily skin care regimen may help to reduce or even remove cosmetic acne and blocked pores.

Everybody can develop cosmetic acne. Since it takes time to appear, most women do not connect appearance of clogged pores to repeated application of particular acne-provoking products. They get into vicious cycle: the more whiteheads appear, the more make-up is applied to conceal acne manifestations. This only causes new breakouts.

Test one new product at a time

Sometimes temptation to try many new products at a time is irresistible. Though, it’s a bad practice. You won’t be able to track back efficiency of each cosmetic product. Good advice is to test new product alone, avoiding application of any other new health-and-beauty aids.

Introduce one new product to your beauty regimen at a time. If you notice any acne manifestations within a few days after application stop using the product and see whether your breakouts will go off. If they vanish, product is likely to be comedogenic and cause clogged pores. You may repeat application to reassure yourself that this health-and-beauty aid leads to blocked pores.

Precautions

Don’t use cosmetics that contain lanolin derivatives, isopropyl myristate or its substitutes, laureth-4 and D&C red dyes. Examine product labels to provide that cosmetic formula is safe and hasn’t been altered lately.

Choose natural products that prevent acne, cleanse debris and open pores without irritation or any other consequences. The one that regenerates damaged tissues will be perfect.

Follow these recommendations to prevent clogged pores and cosmetic acne.

Cosmetic Ingredients to Clog Pores

Cosmetic Acne

Clogged pores (comedones) caused by certain cosmetic ingredients lead to spots and acne. Cosmetic producers claim that their goods don’t cause comedones just to boost sales. We gullibly buy such products to overcome skin conditions.

Cosmetic acne strikes both males and females aged from teens to early thirties. You can tell it by small whiteheads emerging in cheeks, chin and forehead areas. It doesn’t lead to scarring but may have considerable consequences. Rubbing irritating oils into your skin pores which are already trying to treat inherent oils provokes blocked pores.

Some cosmetic ingredients cause comedonal acne even in insusceptible skin. Cosmetic acne typically occurs after several months of comedogenic products ongoing application. Thus, it is hard to trace back causative agent. Cosmetic acne sufferer gets trapped: the more blemishes appear the more acne producing make-up is used to mask them.

Comedogenic cosmetic ingredients

Comedogenic cosmetic ingredients don’t necessarily cause pores clogging, especially in those who possess acne insusceptible, normal or dry skin. Comedogenic ingredients position on the label reflects its concentration. The lower it is listed the less its concentration is. Reasonably concentrated comedogenic ingredients are less likely to clog pores.

Three groups of acne-producing ingredients can be advanced:
Lanolins
Lanolins (sheep skin oils obtained from wool) are widely used in cosmetics. They contain fatty acids which similarly to human ones cause acne in comedo prone skin. Such lanolin derivatives as etoxylated and acetylated lanolins employed in cosmetic products lead to pores blocking. Partially synthetic lanolins have better access to skin pores. Pure lanolin oil is bearable.

Isopropyl myristate with its derivatives
Isopropyl myristate is severe penetrating oil to be contained in rust remover Liquid Wrench. It facilitates cosmetics application providing the skin with a film of smoothness and freshness. Though, left in glass for 12 hours it can transfer over glass edge onto the table. There are other cosmetic ingredients resembling isopropyl myristate:  isopropyl palmitate, isopropyl isothermal, putty sterate, isostearyl neopentonate, myristyl myristate, decyl oleate, octyl sterate, octyl palmitate and isocetyl stearate and PPG myristyl propionate.  They are to be avoided as well as surface-active agents, i.e. aureth-4.

Drug & Cosmetic Dyes
Topical researches revealed another pore clogging cosmetic ingredients. Certain red dyes to be contained by blushes produce acne.  Drug & Cosmetic pigments are obtained from coal tar which has been proved to be comedogenic since medics have evidenced that acne was the cost of chimney sweep occupation. Substitute red dyes with carmine which occurs in bug wings.